Income Inequality

Any Press is Good Press? Study Finds Federal Investigations of University Responses to Sexual Misconduct Cases May Help Enrollments

Despite concerns among administrators that news coverage of campus sexual assault will harm universities’ reputations and bottom lines, a study finds an increase in applications...

When It Comes to Gender Imbalances, Academia’s Ignorance Is Self-Serving

The Ravina vs. Columbia case illustrates that challenging the status quo can be immensely costly. We economists should collectively think about how we can...

Why Every Good Economist Should Be Feminist

As every good economist knows, markets work best when they are competitive. Therefore, every good economist should also be a feminist, defending a level...

How to Even Out the Pains and Gains from International Trade

The idea of creating transfer schemes to compensate the losers from international trade yet still preserve some of the gains faces a myriad of...

When Social Policy Saves Lives: Analyzing Trends in Mortality Inequality in the United States and France

Understanding how inequalities in health and inequalities in income are connected is key for policymaking. New research analyzing mortality trends in the United States...

How US Voters React to Immigration in the Voting Booth May Depend on Both Immigrants’ and Native Residents’ Skill Levels

A new working paper has revealed two strikingly divergent correlations between increases in high-skilled and low-skilled immigration and change in Republican vote share since...

Gabriel Zucman: “Some People in Economics Feel That Talking About Inequality Is Not What Economists Should Be Doing"

The rising scholar of taxation and inequality talks to ProMarket about the problems excessive economic power poses for open political systems, how states can...

Education Quality Has Less to Do with Adult Outcomes Than You Might Think

A new paper assesses the contributions of education and labor markets to differences across regional labor markets in the United States and finds that differences in access to...

Excessive Zoning Makes Us Poorer and More Unequal

We normally think of income inequality as a function of differences in class or socioeconomic status. But much more than generally realized, geographic differences...

Why Democracy Fails to Reduce Inequality: Blame the Brahmin Left

A new paper by Thomas Piketty finds that major parties on both sides of the political spectrum have been captured by elites and warns...

Latest news

The Kroger-Albertsons Merger Threatens Smaller Upstream Suppliers

Much of the conversation of the proposed Kroger-Albertsons merger has focused on the risks to consumers. However, the merger also poses serious implications for the grocers’ upstream suppliers, particularly smaller regional firms.

Why Have Uninsured Depositors Become De Facto Insured?

Due to a change in how the FDIC resolves failed banks, uninsured deposits have become de facto insured. Not only is this dangerous for risk in the banking system, it is not what Congress intends the FDIC to do, writes Michael Ohlrogge.

Merger Law Reaches Acquirer Incentives and Private Equity Strategies

Steven C. Salop argues that Section 7 of the Clayton Act prohibits mergers in which the acquiring firm’s unilateral incentives and business strategy are likely to lessen market competition.

Tim Wu Responds to Letter by Former Agency Chief Economists

Former special assistant to the president for technology and competition policy Tim Wu responds to the November 27 letter signed by former chief economists at the Federal Trade Commission and Justice Department Antitrust Division calling for a separation of the legal and economic analysis in the draft Merger Guidelines.

Can the Public Moderate Social Media?

ProMarket student editor Surya Gowda reviews the arguments made by Paul Gowder in his new book, The Networked Leviathan: For Democratic Platforms.

Uninhibited Campaign Donations Risks Creating Oligarchy

In new research, Valentino Larcinese and Alberto Parmigiani find that the 1986 Reagan tax cuts led to greater campaign spending from wealthy individuals, who benefited the most from this policy. The authors argue that a very permissive system of political finance, combined with the erosion of tax progressivity, created the conditions for the mutual reinforcement of economic and political disparities. The result was an inequality spiral hardly compatible with democratic ideals.

Did the Meme Stock Revolution Actually Change Anything?

Many financial commentators thought that the surge of retail investors participating in the stock market, the most notable of whom boosted “meme stocks” like GameStop, would democratize corporate governance and improve prosocial firm behavior, including the promotion of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) goals. In new research, Dhruv Aggarwal, Albert H. Choi, and Yoon-Ho Alex Lee find evidence that the exact opposite took place.