Income Inequality

How Market Power Worsens Income Inequality

Inequality in stock ownership has grown considerably over the past two decades and is far more pronounced than inequality in consumption or income. A...

What Comes After Trickle-Down Trade Liberalization?

The United States needs to rethink its trade policy. A new report offers a blueprint, consisting of ten major reforms. US trade policy is at...

Reducing Wealth Inequality Through Wealth Taxes Without Compromising Economic Growth

New research proposes two ways of using wealth taxes to reduce inequality and increase efficiency. Economic inequality has risen significantly within major economies around the...

Davos Elites Love to Advocate for Equality – So Long As Nothing Gets Done

The return to the industrial relations and tax policies of the early 19th century has been spearheaded by people who speak the language of...

The Malleable Demand for Trade Protection: How Political Campaigns Can Easily Manipulate Public Attitudes Toward Public Policy

Where does today’s anti-trade sentiment come from? A new study finds that people are particularly sensitive to job losses and outsourcing due to international...

Facebook, Extreme Inequality, and Globalization: ProMarket’s Top Stories of 2018

As 2018 draws to a close, we look back at ProMarket’s most-read and most-widely shared stories of the past year.     The early mentor to Mark...

The Inequality Paradox: Rising Inequalities Nationally, Diminishing Inequality Worldwide

Workers in emerging economies benefitted from globalization and workers in rich countries, on balance, did not. Overturning globalization, however, will neither work nor bring...

Does Sweden’s Radical Right Reflect Too Much Social Inclusivity, Or Too Little?

Many have attributed the success of the far-right Sweden Democrats to Sweden's open immigration policy. Instead, a new study shows that income inequality and...

Inequality in the Middle East

Survey estimates suggest that inequality in the Middle East is not particularly high despite considerable political conflict. This column uses new ‘distributional national accounts’...

Any Press is Good Press? Study Finds Federal Investigations of University Responses to Sexual Misconduct Cases May Help Enrollments

Despite concerns among administrators that news coverage of campus sexual assault will harm universities’ reputations and bottom lines, a study finds an increase in applications...

Latest news

The Kroger-Albertsons Merger Will Not Help Grocery Competition

Kroger and Albertsons say they need to merge to compete with Walmart. Claire Kelloway argues that what they really want is Walmart’s monopsony power, and permitting mergers on these grounds will only harm suppliers, workers, and consumers.

Innovators Respond to Their Presidential Candidate Winning With More Innovation

Does an inventor’s political identity influence their productivity? In a new paper, Joseph Engelberg, Runjing Lu, William Mullins, and Richard Townsend examine the impacts of the 2008 and 2016 United States presidential elections on Democrat and Republican inventors, with a particular focus on the quantity and quality of patents after the country elects a new president.

Letter to the Editor: Former FTC and DOJ Chief Economists Urge Separation of Economic and Legal Analysis in Merger Guidelines

Seventeen former chief economists of the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice Antitrust Division urge current Agency heads to separate the legal and economic analysis in the draft Merger Guidelines to strengthen the role of the latter in merger review.

Why the Kroger-Albertsons Merger Is a Mess for Consumers

Grocers Kroger and Albertsons want to merge, which would make them the second biggest retail food chain and, according to them, enhance their ability to compete with Walmart and Costco and offer lower prices to consumers. Christine P. Bartholomew writes that the promises of more competition and lower prices for consumers are unlikely to manifest, and thus the Federal Trade Commission should block the deal.  

After Neoliberalism

The following is an excerpt from Martin Daunton's new book, "The Economic Government of the World: 1933-2023," out November 14.

US Taxpayers Should Not Be Subsidizing Harmful Big Oil Mergers

Chevron and ExxonMobil claim their announced mergers with Hess and Pioneer take advantage of market efficiencies, but a closer look reveals an antiquated tax provision likely sweetening these dangerous deals. Antitrust authorities must carefully review the serious risks entailed in these proposed mergers. In parallel, the United States federal government needs to end large tax-free reorganizations—the most egregious way in which American taxpayers are subsidizing monopolistic practices, writes Niko Lusiani.

Seeing Others

In an excerpt from her new book, Seeing Others, sociologist Michèle Lamont describes the impact of neoliberal ideas on the working class.