Roy Shapira

Roy Shapira is a legal scholar who focuses on the interactions between regulation, reputation, and litigation. His book on these topics, Law and Reputation, came out in 2020 (in Cambridge University Press). Shapira received his LLM and SJD degrees from Harvard Law School, and he is currently at Reichman University Law School (IDC).

Is Big Business Ungovernable? 

Regulators should dedicate more resources to pursuing big cases against the biggest market actors, even if it means compiling far fewer enforcement...

Max Oversight Duties: How the Boeing Case Signifies a Shift in Corporate Law

Why did regulation, corporate governance, and fear of repetitional harm fail to prevent the Boeing 737 Max debacle from happening? A new...

President-Elect Joe Biden and the Real Lessons of DuPont

Simply talking corporate America into being more responsible is not enough. It may get corporations to talk the talk, but not to...

How the Legal System Helps the Media Hold the Powerful to Account

The legal system is the bloodline of investigative journalism. Recent maneuvers by the Trump administration may jeopardize it.     When done effectively, investigative journalism can greatly...

Does Environmental Crime Pay?

A new Stigler Center working paper conducts a cost-benefit analysis of DuPont's emissions of a toxic chemical dubbed C8. The Trump administration has shown clear signs that it...

Managing Political Risk

A recent working paper suggests that firms react to political risk, both passively by cutting investment and employment, and actively by ramping up lobbying efforts. From Trump...

Attorneys General for Sale? We Should Focus on the Practice, Not Just on Trump’s Role

Trump is not the only, nor the biggest, player in the game of influencing attorneys general. Singling him out for opprobrium is aiming at the...

Regulators as Validators

Special interest groups can use their influence over regulation to water down not just potential legal sanctions but also potential reputational sanctions. What deters corporate...

Making it Look Like a Struggle

 For capture to be sustainable, the regulator has to find ways to be perceived as being tough on the regulated without really hurting them. The...

Who Killed Corporate Reputation?

Regulation and reputation are not independent of each other. Regulation can substitute, crowd out, or even implement the power of reputational concerns. A better understanding...

Latest news

How Financial Contracting Could Help the Police Force Manage Its Aims More Effectively

Hamid Mehran proposes funded deferred pay, an incentive structure to mitigate the risk and costs of police misconduct.

Event Notes: “China’s Political Economy” in Review

The Stigler Center's "China Political Economy" webinar series returns Thursday, February 9. Here's a reminder of what we covered in our first...

To Build an Equitable Economy, We Must Understand Capitalism’s Racist Heritage

American capitalism was built on racial exploitation, from the enslavement of Black people to institutionalized discrimination and its structural impact on our...

How To Ensure Industrial Policy Promotes Public Over Private Gain

Industrial policy was once so out of fashion that it was jokingly called “the policy that shall not be named.” Now it’s...

More than Economics, Ideology Determines US Voters’ Preferences for Redistribution

The US stands out among developed economies for its comparatively low level of redistribution as a percentage of GDP. Gustavo de Souza...

Stakeholder Motivations for “Private Sanctions” Against Russia

As the war in Ukraine enters its second year, a new study measures stakeholders’ desire to see their firms exit Russia and...

The Wicked Problem Embodied by The Twitter Files

In response to a recent ProMarket post about the Twitter Files, professor Tom Ginsburg points out that the toughest question lies in...