Roy Shapira

Roy Shapira is a legal scholar who focuses on the interactions between regulation, reputation, and litigation. His book on these topics, Law and Reputation, came out in 2020 (in Cambridge University Press). Shapira received his LLM and SJD degrees from Harvard Law School, and he is currently at Reichman University Law School (IDC).

Is Big Business Ungovernable? 

Regulators should dedicate more resources to pursuing big cases against the biggest market actors, even if it means compiling far fewer enforcement...

Max Oversight Duties: How the Boeing Case Signifies a Shift in Corporate Law

Why did regulation, corporate governance, and fear of repetitional harm fail to prevent the Boeing 737 Max debacle from happening? A new...

President-Elect Joe Biden and the Real Lessons of DuPont

Simply talking corporate America into being more responsible is not enough. It may get corporations to talk the talk, but not to...

How the Legal System Helps the Media Hold the Powerful to Account

The legal system is the bloodline of investigative journalism. Recent maneuvers by the Trump administration may jeopardize it.     When done effectively, investigative journalism can greatly...

Does Environmental Crime Pay?

A new Stigler Center working paper conducts a cost-benefit analysis of DuPont's emissions of a toxic chemical dubbed C8. The Trump administration has shown clear signs that it...

Managing Political Risk

A recent working paper suggests that firms react to political risk, both passively by cutting investment and employment, and actively by ramping up lobbying efforts. From Trump...

Attorneys General for Sale? We Should Focus on the Practice, Not Just on Trump’s Role

Trump is not the only, nor the biggest, player in the game of influencing attorneys general. Singling him out for opprobrium is aiming at the...

Regulators as Validators

Special interest groups can use their influence over regulation to water down not just potential legal sanctions but also potential reputational sanctions. What deters corporate...

Making it Look Like a Struggle

 For capture to be sustainable, the regulator has to find ways to be perceived as being tough on the regulated without really hurting them. The...

Who Killed Corporate Reputation?

Regulation and reputation are not independent of each other. Regulation can substitute, crowd out, or even implement the power of reputational concerns. A better understanding...

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Democratize Work

An excerpt from a new book, Democratize Work: The Case for Reorganizing the Economy, advocates democratizing firms and decommodifying work.

Antitrust Enforcement, Inflation and Corporate Greed: What do we know?

At a recent Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) event, panelists, including the Stigler Center's own Luigi Zingales, reflected on the roles...

Data is Abundant But is it Accessible to Researchers?

Despite the wide availability of data, ensuring independent access to data sources has never been more crucial. How can researchers engage in...

Private Labels in Online Marketplaces

On their store shelves, Walmart has its own products under the "Great Value” brand, and Tesco has its own “Everyday Value” products....

Bolsonaro’s reelection may become a setback for ESG in Brazil

Social pressures, market forces and elected leaders influence corporate decisions on environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues. Journalist Stephanie Tondo examines the...

2023 Antitrust and Competition Conference: Call for Papers

The Stigler Center is inviting submissions of short academic articles (up to 3000 words) focused on the development of a legal/economic...

ProMarket Seeks New Deputy Managing Editor

We're hiring! Many ProMarket readers will now know that Asher Schechter, former deputy editor at...