Guy Rolnik

Guy Rolnik is a Clinical Professor for Strategic Management at the University of Chicago Booth school of Business. Rolnik is the Founder of Israel’s leading economics newspaper TheMarker and is considered the most Influential economic journalist in Israel in the last 2 decades. Rolnik served for 15 years as Editor-in-Chief of TheMarker and 7 years as the Deputy Publisher of Haaretz daily newspaper - Israel oldest and most important newspaper. Rolnik is the recipient (2013) of the Sokolov (Israeli Pulitzer) life-time-achievement award for excellence in Journalism. He is credited with revolutionizing the Israeli Journalism and media worlds and as bringing dramatic changes to the economic and social discourse in Israel. Rolnik researches and writes about Political Economy, Financial Markets, Antitrust and Regulation. He teaches courses on Regulation, Corporate Reputation and Communication at the Booth school at University of Chicago, in Tel Aviv University and I.D.C in Israel.

Can Companies Use Climate Change as an Excuse to Obtain More Market Power? A ProMarket Interview

In an interview with ProMarket, Jürgen Kühling, the chair of Germany’s Monopolies Commission, discusses the relationship between climate change and antitrust, what...

Q&A With FTC Chair Lina Khan: “The Word ‘Efficiency’ Doesn’t Appear Anywhere in the Antitrust Statutes”

FTC Chair Lina Khan sat down with Guy Rolnik to discuss changes in governmental posture toward antitrust enforcement, her goals as head...

DOJ Antitrust Head Jonathan Kanter: “We Are Making It Very Clear: We’re Going to Hold Individuals Accountable”

In an interview with ProMarket, assistant attorney general Jonathan Kanter, head of the Department of Justice’s antitrust division, explains why he believes...

President-Elect Joe Biden and the Real Lessons of DuPont

Simply talking corporate America into being more responsible is not enough. It may get corporations to talk the talk, but not to...

How Benjamin Netanyahu Used the Covid-19 Crisis to Save His Political Career

As countries around the world are waging war on the coronavirus, Israel’s prime minister has managed to leverage the crisis to gain more power...

“We Were Naïve,” Says FCC Chair Who Oversaw the Creation of Section 230

In an interview with ProMarket, former FCC chair Reed Hundt spoke about antitrust, Big Tech platforms, the future of the 1996 provision that provided legal protection...

The Hidden Risk in Bernie Sanders's Plan to Save Journalism: an Unholy Alliance Between Publishers and Tech Monopolists

Sanders's plan is important and laudable, but his proposal to use a tax on targeted advertising to fund journalism is dangerous.        Donald Trump is not the...

“Emmanuel Macron Is Not a Liberal, He Just Pretends to Be”

The French president found himself under fire following an attempted police raid on the offices of the investigative news site Mediapart. While many around...

The News Media’s Business Model of Extortion

The Jeff Bezos vs. The National Enquirer scandal highlights the role that extortion may play in the business model of some news outlets.  Jeff Bezos’s...

“Short Sellers Don't Exist to Fix the Problems. They Exist to Shed Light on the Problems”

In an interview with ProMarket, Fahmi Quadir, the short seller whose bet against Valeant in 2015 helped expose the company's misdeeds, talks about short...

Latest news

Uninhibited Campaign Donations Risks Creating Oligarchy

In new research, Valentino Larcinese and Alberto Parmigiani find that the 1986 Reagan tax cuts led to greater campaign spending from wealthy individuals, who benefited the most from this policy. The authors argue that a very permissive system of political finance, combined with the erosion of tax progressivity, created the conditions for the mutual reinforcement of economic and political disparities. The result was an inequality spiral hardly compatible with democratic ideals.

Did the Meme Stock Revolution Actually Change Anything?

Many financial commentators thought that the surge of retail investors participating in the stock market, the most notable of whom boosted “meme stocks” like GameStop, would democratize corporate governance and improve prosocial firm behavior, including the promotion of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) goals. In new research, Dhruv Aggarwal, Albert H. Choi, and Yoon-Ho Alex Lee find evidence that the exact opposite took place.

The Kroger-Albertsons Merger Will Not Help Grocery Competition

Kroger and Albertsons say they need to merge to compete with Walmart. Claire Kelloway argues that what they really want is Walmart’s monopsony power, and permitting mergers on these grounds will only harm suppliers, workers, and consumers.

Innovators Respond to Their Presidential Candidate Winning With More Innovation

Does an inventor’s political identity influence their productivity? In a new paper, Joseph Engelberg, Runjing Lu, William Mullins, and Richard Townsend examine the impacts of the 2008 and 2016 United States presidential elections on Democrat and Republican inventors, with a particular focus on the quantity and quality of patents after the country elects a new president.

Letter to the Editor: Former FTC and DOJ Chief Economists Urge Separation of Economic and Legal Analysis in Merger Guidelines

Seventeen former chief economists of the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice Antitrust Division urge current Agency heads to separate the legal and economic analysis in the draft Merger Guidelines to strengthen the role of the latter in merger review.

Why the Kroger-Albertsons Merger Is a Mess for Consumers

Grocers Kroger and Albertsons want to merge, which would make them the second biggest retail food chain and, according to them, enhance their ability to compete with Walmart and Costco and offer lower prices to consumers. Christine P. Bartholomew writes that the promises of more competition and lower prices for consumers are unlikely to manifest, and thus the Federal Trade Commission should block the deal.  

After Neoliberalism

The following is an excerpt from Martin Daunton's new book, "The Economic Government of the World: 1933-2023," out November 14.