Regulatory Capture

The Elusiveness of Regulatory Capture

Regulatory capture is hard to pin down, its elusiveness stemming from four principal factors. Nearly everyone sees regulatory capture – and rightly disdains it. And...

Regulatory Capture is Not “Inevitable”

“Capture” has become a self-fulfilling prophecy of economists who turn their students into sure-to-fail regulators. A Wall Street Journal editorial asserted the “inevitability” of...

Prosecuting Corporate Criminals

Prosecutions of individual corporate criminals can, in fact, be successful—and are critical for attaining justice. It is difficult to escape the inference that the Great...

Regulatory Capture, Ancient and Modern

Regulatory capture's antecedents in political thought—which date back to ancient Greece—inform the modern concept. Until recently, the term regulatory capture seemed stale, a mid-20th century...

Making it Look Like a Struggle

 For capture to be sustainable, the regulator has to find ways to be perceived as being tough on the regulated without really hurting them. The...

Preventing Regulatory Capture

When a regulation’s benefits exceed its costs, simplicity and interdisciplinary processes are essential to reducing capture. Regulatory capture arises when regulatory decisions advance private interests...

Challenges in Measuring Regulatory Capture

We as a society have failed to settle upon what we think are the measurements, the correlates, the red flags, and the warning signs...

Fighting Regulatory Capture in the 21st Century

It should come as no surprise that the movement against regulatory capture is gaining momentum at this particular moment in our nation’s history. It is...

The 'Argumentum a Crise': So Powerful, So Prone to Misuse

Since the financial crisis and the related euro debt crisis, the use of the argumentum a crise has been ubiquitous. A more selective use...

The Attacks on RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan: Lessons from Stanley Fischer as a Central Banker

India and Israel show that fighting crony capitalism in countries where a small group of people has huge political and financial influence is sometimes...

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New Study Warns Antitrust Inaction May Lead To Acceptable Collusion for Public Policy Considerations

The modernization of EU antitrust laws muddied the water with regard to the ways that antitrust authorities and courts should handle situations...

Dark Money Dominates Spending by Special Interest Groups and Sways Elections

New research on undisclosed and unlimited political contributions, or dark money, exposes the increasing role that such funds play in U.S. elections.

The “Conspiracy” of Consumer Welfare Theory

Matt Stoller argues there was a conspiracy. It was more of an association with a singular purpose.

Researchers Find Reduced Competition After Pandemic

The chart of the week comes from a new research paper that documents the increase in small business closures during the Covid...

Voters Still Believe Politics is About the Common Good, Not Just Rent-Seeking

Do voters still believe that politics can be a source for common-good policies and not just partisan bickering and rent-seeking? With political...

How to Design Data Protection Laws That Actually Work 

More and more countries are passing data protection laws, yet empirical studies show that these laws rarely deliver on their promises. A...

Are Monopolists or Cartels the True Source of Anticompetitive US Political Power?

Trade associations are often the biggest obstacles to competitive markets, especially when those organizations use their influence to change public policy in...