Labor share

Global vs. Local: What Drives Changes in Labor’s Share of Income

A new working paper examines the relationship between competition policy and the decline in the labor share across the developed world and...

The Profit Paradox: “What’s Good for Firms Is Not Necessarily Good for the Workers”

In an interview with ProMarket, Jan Eeckhout discusses his new book The Profit Paradox and explains how market power brings down wages,...

The Monopoly Harms That Antitrust Keeps Missing

In his new book Monopolized, journalist David Dayen tells the stories of individuals who have suffered at the hands of monopolists, showing...

Antitrust Law’s Current Stance Toward Workers Violates Its Original Purpose to Balance Power With Powerful Firms

Antitrust law’s present-day bias against democratic cooperation and in favor of top-down corporate control has contributed more broadly to the institutional weakness and perceived...

Banning Noncompete Agreements Benefits Low-Wage Workers

Examining the effects of a 2008 ban on noncompete agreements for low-wage workers in Oregon, a recent paper finds that the ban increased average...

The Lousy Job Economy: Young People Bear the Brunt of a Long-Term Decline in American Job Quality

A new study finds a steady decline in the quality of American jobs between 1979 to 2017, even as GDP has grown. This decline...

The Limits of Private Action: What the Past 40 Years Taught Us About the Perils of Unregulated Markets

The two big ideas that animated American public policy since the end of World War II, employer-sponsored social benefits and neoliberalism, are failures. We...

Global Declining Competition

Studies of the evolution of market power since 2000 have focused mostly on publicly traded US firms. This column introduces a new global study...

Regulators Should Not Change the Regulatory Environment to Include Labor Market Concentration

Research has shown that labor markets with higher levels of labor market concentration have lower wages. It does not necessarily follow that regulators should...

The “Biggest Puzzle in Economics”: Why the “Superstar Economy” Lacks Any Actual Superstars

A new study finds that the contribution of superstar firms to US productivity growth has decreased by more than 40 percent over the past...

LATEST NEWS

More than Economics, Ideology Determines US Voters’ Preferences for Redistribution

The US stands out among developed economies for its comparatively low level of redistribution as a percentage of GDP. Gustavo de Souza...

Stakeholder Motivations for “Private Sanctions” Against Russia

As the war in Ukraine enters its second year, a new study measures stakeholders’ desire to see their firms exit Russia and...

The Wicked Problem Embodied by The Twitter Files

In response to a recent ProMarket post about the Twitter Files, professor Tom Ginsburg points out that the toughest question lies in...

Study Shows Universal Bank Trades Are Informed by Private Commercial Borrower Information

New research by Rainer Haselmann, Christian Leuz, and Sebastian Schreiber finds evidence suggesting that German banks with commercial lending relationships improve their...

Industrial Policy Is a Seductive Mirage

Industrial policy was once so out of fashion that it was jokingly called “the policy that shall not be named.” Now it’s...