Financial Crisis

Why Financial Regulations Might Fail to Produce Their Desired Outcome: The Case of the Capital Conservation Buffer

The capital conservation buffer (CCB) was created after the 2008 financial crisis, instructing banks to retain their dividends in an escrow account and...

Americans Report Record Level of Trust in Banks and Big Corporations, But not in the US Government

2019 Chicago Booth/Kellogg School Financial Trust Index increases from 27.6 percent to 33.3 percent, showing the highest level of financial trust from the American...

How Antimonopoly Was Revitalized, Part 2: Barack Obama and the End of the End of History

In this second installment of his three-part series on antitrust’s recent resurrection, Matt Stoller discusses the legacy of Obama’s presidency. The...

Ten Years After the Financial Crisis: “We Are Safer, But Not As Safe As We Should and Could Be”

Experts from academia and industry gathered at the University of Oxford to revisit what went wrong in the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis,...

“In the Wake of the 2008 Crisis, You Can't Ignore the Influence of Big Business on Economic Policy”

Historian and author Adam Tooze talks to ProMarket about how the financial crisis “remade” American capitalism, why the US response to the crisis was...

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (September 7–16)

Is the government's response to the 2008 financial crisis responsible for the rise of populism in the US and Europe?; the real Google censorship...

How the Triple Tax Exemption on Puerto Rico’s Bonds Financed Its Territorial Status—and Helped Spark Its Debt Crisis

How did Puerto Rico manage to incur a monumental debt of $72 billion without raising red flags among the sophisticated investors who continuously bought...

What Schumpeter Can Teach Economists about the Great Recession

Ten years after Lehman Brothers’ failure, Schumpeter’s analysis of the Great Depression and his warnings to posterity are as timely as they are prophetic,...

Why Are There So Few Bankers on American Corporate Boards?

Relatively few American companies have bankers on their boards. New research reveals that bankers were commonly represented on corporate boards in the 19th century,...

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (May 19–26)

Trump signs the largest rollback of financial regulations since the 2008 crisis into law; Zuckerberg masterfully evades the questions of European parliamentarians; Amazon has...

LATEST NEWS

New Study Warns Antitrust Inaction May Lead To Acceptable Collusion for Public Policy Considerations

The modernization of EU antitrust laws muddied the water with regard to the ways that antitrust authorities and courts should handle situations...

Dark Money Dominates Spending by Special Interest Groups and Sways Elections

New research on undisclosed and unlimited political contributions, or dark money, exposes the increasing role that such funds play in U.S. elections.

The “Conspiracy” of Consumer Welfare Theory

Matt Stoller argues there was a conspiracy. It was more of an association with a singular purpose.

Researchers Find Reduced Competition After Pandemic

The chart of the week comes from a new research paper that documents the increase in small business closures during the Covid...

Voters Still Believe Politics is About the Common Good, Not Just Rent-Seeking

Do voters still believe that politics can be a source for common-good policies and not just partisan bickering and rent-seeking? With political...