Chris Sagers

Chris Sagers is the the James A. Thomas Distinguished Professor of Law at the Cleveland State University and Faculty Director of the Cleveland-Marshall Solo Practice Incubator. He joined the faculty in the fall of 2002. He has taught courses in Antitrust, Banking Regulation, Business Organizations, Law & Economics, Administrative Law, Legislation and the Regulatory State, and a seminar concerning the theory of the firm. He has testified before the U.S. Congress and the Antitrust Modernization Commission. He is the author of Apple, Antitrust, and Irony (Harvard Univ. Press 2016), and Antitrust Examples & Explanations, co-author, with Theresa Gabaldon of George Washington University, of a casebook on business organizations from Aspen Publishing, and co-author of Sullivan, Grimes & Sagers, The Law of Antitrust, a leading hornbook. He frequently participates in important antitrust litigation, by consulting with plaintiffs and enforcement officials pro bono, and authoring briefs amicus curiae in federal courts of appeals. He is a member of the American Law Institute, a Senior Fellow of the American Antitrust Institute, and a leadership member of the ABA Antitrust Section. In 2015 he was awarded the University's campus-wide Distinguished Research Award for Faculty. The law school's alumni association has awarded him the Walter G. Stapleton Award for Faculty Excellence, and he has twice been elected Teacher of the Year by the students at large. Before joining CSU, Sagers practiced law for four years in Washington, D.C., first at Arnold & Porter and then at Shea & Gardner. He earned his law and public policy degrees at the University of Michigan and was an editor of the Michigan Law Review.

The News About Antitrust’s Impending Resurgence Has Been Greatly Exaggerated

The federal antitrust agencies don’t appear to be serious about their recent Big Tech push. And given that the Supreme Court and federal judiciary...

Paging Don Qixote: The Last Hope for American Merger Law

Of the eight or nine hundred antitrust claims each year, few are private merger claims, and almost all of them fail. That is why...

Ohio v. American Express: Clarence Thomas Sets Sail on a Sea of Doubt, and, Mirabile Dictu, It’s Still a Bad Idea

SCOTUS Forum. In the first of a roundtable of op-eds on the Supreme Court’s Amex decision of June 25, Chris Sagers harks back to...

No Fair Hearing for the DoJ in the AT&T-Time Warner Decision

Antitrust expert Chris Sagers of Cleveland State University enumerates the failings of Judge Richard Leon’s dismissal last week of the Department of Justice’s attempt...

Could the Steward Health v. BCBS Trial Revitalize Monopolization Law?

It’s nearly unheard of for a monopolization case to go to trial, but the Steward Health v. Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Rhode...

The DOJ Has a Strong Case Against the AT&T-Time Warner Merger

If the merging parties are true to their many tough public statements, and they stick the litigation out long-term, the odds are not bad...

American Antitrust Is Having a Moment: Some Reactions to Commissioner Ohlhausen’s Recent Views

Contrary to what Federal Trade Commissioner Maureen Ohlhausen says, there is in fact no meaningful proof that consolidation generates social benefits. Editor's note: In...

Latest news

Healthcare Companies Spent More on Lobbying Than Any Other Industry Last Year

Threatened by regulated price caps from congress, the pharmaceutical industry spent nearly $390 million on lobbying in 2021 according to new data...

Antitrust and Rule by Judges

The early-1980s Posner-Stigler memorandum to incoming president Reagan’s transition team is interesting for a host of reasons, but most of all in...

Should the European Union Require Tech Firms to Adopt a Common Charger?

According to a new European Commission directive expected to be approved in the next few months, tech firms will have to use...

Chart of the Week: Economists Don’t Think Congress Should Make Price Gouging Illegal

Most economists disagree with a new bill in the US that would set limits on "unconscionably excessive prices," according to a recent...

Neoliberal Economists Are Giving Biden Bad Advice on Inflation

To spare the economy from the pain of further interest rate hikes, the President should aggressively pursue anticompetitive conduct by companies in...

How Would the Big Tech Self-Preferencing Bill Affect Users? 

The Senate looks to be nearing a vote on the American Innovation and Choice Online Act, which would prohibit gatekeeping digital platforms...

New eBook Revisits George Stigler’s Theory of Regulatory Capture 50 Years Later

To mark the 50-year anniversary of George Stigler’s seminal piece, “The Theory of Economic Regulation” we are publishing a new eBook examining...