special interest groups

How Interest Groups Utilize Reverse Revolving Doors to Influence Legislative Voting

A new study finds that legislators who worked for interest groups before taking office influence the voting behavior of their colleagues when...

Fake Comments Cause Real Harm: How the Public Comment Process Was Corrupted

Turning a blind eye to the corruption of the public comment process—or worse, lumping together genuine mass comments with fraudulent comments—corrupts the...

How Do Members of Congress React to the Potential of Lucrative Private Sector Employment?

Many fear that the potential for well-paid post-elective jobs can make legislators give rewards to their future employers. A new study finds that career...

A Tale of Two Cities: Hamburg and Lübeck

The German cities of Hamburg and Lübeck have an interwoven and eventful history. Whereas Lübeck offers an example of how dominant cities may become unattractive...

Is Direct Democracy Better Able to Withstand the Influence of Special Interests?

A new Stigler Center working paper looks into the effects of referendums and public initiatives on public policy and finds that direct democracy better...

How Many Newt Gingrich's Are There in Washington? Much More Than You Might Think

As more and more lobbyists move to consulting and PR agencies, experts say the underworld of hidden lobbying is probably much bigger than what formal...

Donald Trump’s Economic Policies: Pro-Business, Not Pro-Market

Trump is eliminating lobbyists by putting them in charge of all departments. After his election,1 it was...

Democracy Against Domination: Overcoming Economic Power and Regulatory Failure in the New Gilded Age

The financial crisis—and the limits of our regulatory response to the crash—offer important lessons for our broader understandings of how to conceptualize and institutionalize...

Are Special Interests Dooming the Euro to Fail?

As the Eurozone struggles to stave off a lingering economic crisis, four economists debate the measures necessary to ensure its survival and what’s preventing...

Productivity, Inequality, and Economic Rents

Curbing excessive economic rents might bolster productivity and address rising inequality. Productivity growth—a necessary (though not sufficient) condition for rising incomes in the long run—has...

LATEST NEWS

Should The Competitive Process Test Replace The Consumer Welfare Standard?

Jonathan Kanter, Assistant Attorney General for the Department of Justice Antitrust Division, recently gave a speech condemning the use of the consumer...

Delaware: The State Where Companies Can Vote

Adapted from What’s the Matter with Delaware: How the First State Has Favored the Rich, Powerful, and Criminal—and How It Costs Us...

The NCAA Goes After College Athletes’ NIL Money—Here are the Antitrust Implications for Workers and Consumers

Having lost in the Supreme Court on student-athlete academic benefits, the NCAA has signaled a continuing attempt to suppress competition in the...

Have Business Roundtable Companies Lived Up to Their Stakeholder Commitments?  

In 2019, more than 100 CEOs of US public companies signed a Business Roundtable statement in which they pledged to deliver value...

Do Protests Matter At All for Shifting Government Policy Around Economic Redistribution?

New research on the effectiveness of protests on government distributions provides insights into the political incentives of a country’s leadership and the...
  1. This post was originally published in Il Sole 24 Ore.[]