Labor

Antitrust’s Monopsony Problem

Four cases from the past decade alleging employer collusion against workers show that at present, antitrust law is ill-equipped to protect workers. A root...

Western Multinationals Can Improve Workers' Safety, If They Want to: The Case of Bangladesh

In 2013, one of the largest factories in Bangladesh collapsed, killing 1,134 workers. Many multinationals committed to improving safety standards. A new study shows...

Banning Noncompete Agreements Benefits Low-Wage Workers

Examining the effects of a 2008 ban on noncompete agreements for low-wage workers in Oregon, a recent paper finds that the ban increased average...

The Lousy Job Economy: Young People Bear the Brunt of a Long-Term Decline in American Job Quality

A new study finds a steady decline in the quality of American jobs between 1979 to 2017, even as GDP has grown. This decline...

How Robert Bork Fathered the New Gilded Age

Much like in the first Gilded Age, antitrust enforcers today are hitting labor, not capital. This is thanks to Robert Bork’s radical and influential...

The Employment Effects of a Gender-Specific Minimum Wage

The first minimum-wage laws in the history of the United States were predominantly gender-specific in that they were imposing a lower bound only on...

The Limits of Private Action: What the Past 40 Years Taught Us About the Perils of Unregulated Markets

The two big ideas that animated American public policy since the end of World War II, employer-sponsored social benefits and neoliberalism, are failures. We...

Restoring Antimonopoly Through Bright-Line Rules

The “consumer welfare” approach to antimonopoly is the main contributor to the extreme and dangerous concentrations of power that Americans face today. In place...

The “Biggest Puzzle in Economics”: Why the “Superstar Economy” Lacks Any Actual Superstars

A new study finds that the contribution of superstar firms to US productivity growth has decreased by more than 40 percent over the past...

Rents and Inclusive Growth: A Decline in Rent Sharing Implies Growing Income Inequalities

A new study looks at the long-run evolution of rent sharing between companies and workers in the UK and finds that rent sharing...

LATEST NEWS

Delaware: The State Where Companies Can Vote

Adapted from What’s the Matter with Delaware: How the First State Has Favored the Rich, Powerful, and Criminal—and How It Costs Us...

The NCAA Goes After College Athletes’ NIL Money—Here are the Antitrust Implications for Workers and Consumers

Having lost in the Supreme Court on student-athlete academic benefits, the NCAA has signaled a continuing attempt to suppress competition in the...

Have Business Roundtable Companies Lived Up to Their Stakeholder Commitments?  

In 2019, more than 100 CEOs of US public companies signed a Business Roundtable statement in which they pledged to deliver value...

Do Protests Matter At All for Shifting Government Policy Around Economic Redistribution?

New research on the effectiveness of protests on government distributions provides insights into the political incentives of a country’s leadership and the...

Mergers and Smoking Guns

A recently uncovered memo from George Stigler and Richard Posner reveals how they thought about antitrust and merger policy in advising the...