Lina M. Khan

Lina Khan is a legal fellow with the Open Markets Program at New America, an associate research scholar at Yale Law School, and a fellow with the Information Society Project. She researches market competition across sectors, and the way that antitrust law and competition policy shape our political economy. Khan’s work has been published by the Yale Law Journal and the Harvard Law & Policy Review, as well as by the New Republic, Politico, the Washington Monthly, and the Washington Post. Her antitrust work has been cited by Bloomberg, The Economist, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal. While at Yale, Khan represented and litigated on behalf of homeowners through the Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic. She also spent summers litigating at Gupta Wessler PLLC, Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. She received a B.A. magna cum laude in political theory from Williams College and a J.D. from Yale Law School.

Designating Tech Platforms as “Information Fiduciaries” Would Do Little to Address the Source of Their Power

The notion that Facebook, Google, and Twitter should be assigned fiduciary duties toward their end users has gained broad support in recent years. However, this...

What Makes Tech Platforms So Powerful?

What are the bases of the digital platforms’ power? In Chapter 3 of our Digital Platforms and Concentration ebook in advance of this month’s...

Amazon at $1,000 – Should We Be Celebrating?

Amazon, whose stock price crossed $1,000 per share last week, illustrates the shortcomings of our current antitrust regime. Last Tuesday, Amazon’s stock price crossed $1,000...

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Should The Competitive Process Test Replace The Consumer Welfare Standard?

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Delaware: The State Where Companies Can Vote

Adapted from What’s the Matter with Delaware: How the First State Has Favored the Rich, Powerful, and Criminal—and How It Costs Us...

The NCAA Goes After College Athletes’ NIL Money—Here are the Antitrust Implications for Workers and Consumers

Having lost in the Supreme Court on student-athlete academic benefits, the NCAA has signaled a continuing attempt to suppress competition in the...

Have Business Roundtable Companies Lived Up to Their Stakeholder Commitments?  

In 2019, more than 100 CEOs of US public companies signed a Business Roundtable statement in which they pledged to deliver value...

Do Protests Matter At All for Shifting Government Policy Around Economic Redistribution?

New research on the effectiveness of protests on government distributions provides insights into the political incentives of a country’s leadership and the...

Mergers and Smoking Guns

A recently uncovered memo from George Stigler and Richard Posner reveals how they thought about antitrust and merger policy in advising the...

Will “Portfolio Primacy” Throw a Monkey Wrench in Elon Musk’s Plans to Acquire Twitter?

The SEC's definition of fiduciary duty allows institutional shareholders to vote against Elon Musk's Twitter takeover bid thanks to portfolio primacy.