Giuseppe Colangelo

Giuseppe Colangelo is a Jean Monnet Professor of European Innovation Policy and an Associate Professor of Law and Economics at University of Basilicata (Italy). He also serves as Adjunct Professor of Markets, Regulation and Law, and of Competition and Markets of Innovation at LUISS (Italy). He is fellow of the Stanford Law School and University of Vienna Transatlantic Technology Law Forum (TTLF), the scientific coordinator of the Research Network for Digital Ecosystem, Economic Policy and Innovation (Deep-In), and an academic affiliate with the International Center for Law & Economics (ICLE). His primary research interests are related to competition law, market regulation, innovation policy, intellectual property, and economic analysis of law. His work has been published in The Antitrust Bulletin, Journal of Antitrust Enforcement, Journal of Competition Law & Economics, World Competition Law and Economics Review, European Journal of Legal Studies, Computer Law & Security Review, Queen Mary Journal of Intellectual Property, European Competition Journal, International Review of Intellectual Property and Competition Law, Journal of European Consumer and Market Law, International Data Privacy Law, International Journal of Law and Information Technology, Journal of European Competition Law and Practice, and European Business Law Review, among the others.

Is It Better to Address the Apple-Google App Store Duopoly Through Antitrust or Regulation? 

A new paper analyzes antitrust investigations and private litigation initiated against the Google and Apple app stores, exploring how the main anticompetitive...

Latest news

Fear of Punishment Distorts Bank Financial Reporting

When bank employees are afraid of punishment from regulators, they are likely to conceal information about their faulty decisions. This in turn...

Should The Competitive Process Test Replace The Consumer Welfare Standard?

Jonathan Kanter, Assistant Attorney General for the Department of Justice Antitrust Division, recently gave a speech condemning the use of the consumer...

Delaware: The State Where Companies Can Vote

Adapted from What’s the Matter with Delaware: How the First State Has Favored the Rich, Powerful, and Criminal—and How It Costs Us...

The NCAA Goes After College Athletes’ NIL Money—Here are the Antitrust Implications for Workers and Consumers

Having lost in the Supreme Court on student-athlete academic benefits, the NCAA has signaled a continuing attempt to suppress competition in the...

Have Business Roundtable Companies Lived Up to Their Stakeholder Commitments?  

In 2019, more than 100 CEOs of US public companies signed a Business Roundtable statement in which they pledged to deliver value...

Do Protests Matter At All for Shifting Government Policy Around Economic Redistribution?

New research on the effectiveness of protests on government distributions provides insights into the political incentives of a country’s leadership and the...

Mergers and Smoking Guns

A recently uncovered memo from George Stigler and Richard Posner reveals how they thought about antitrust and merger policy in advising the...