Elisabeth Kempf

Elisabeth Kempf joined Chicago Booth in 2016. Her primary research interest is in empirical corporate finance. Her research has explored ideological biases and conflicts of interest in information production by financial analysts and economists, as well as issues related to corporate governance. Her work has appeared in the Review of Financial Studies and in the Journal of Financial Economics, and has received a number of awards, including the Financial Research Association Best Paper Award, the AQR Top Finance Graduate Award 2016, the WFA Cubist Systematic Strategies Ph.D. Candidate Award for Outstanding Research, and the Young Scholars Finance Consortium Best Ph.D. Paper Award. Her research has been featured in several news outlets including Bloomberg, CNBC, and the Wall Street Journal. Kempf is also a Research Affiliate at the Centre for Economic Policy and Research.

How the US Partisan Divide Shapes Global Capital Flows

A new empirical paper explores how partisan perception affects capital allocation beyond national borders, showing that the global investment practices of US...

Are American Firms Becoming Politically Polarized?

A new paper examines political polarization among top executives in S&P 1500 firms, highlighting a robust trend toward political polarization in corporate...

Central Bankers Face Potential Conflict of Interest When Writing About QE Policies

As Quantitative Easing makes a return during the global Covid-19 pandemic, its effectiveness has once again come under intense debate in both...

Latest news

Should The Competitive Process Test Replace The Consumer Welfare Standard?

Jonathan Kanter, Assistant Attorney General for the Department of Justice Antitrust Division, recently gave a speech condemning the use of the consumer...

Delaware: The State Where Companies Can Vote

Adapted from What’s the Matter with Delaware: How the First State Has Favored the Rich, Powerful, and Criminal—and How It Costs Us...

The NCAA Goes After College Athletes’ NIL Money—Here are the Antitrust Implications for Workers and Consumers

Having lost in the Supreme Court on student-athlete academic benefits, the NCAA has signaled a continuing attempt to suppress competition in the...

Have Business Roundtable Companies Lived Up to Their Stakeholder Commitments?  

In 2019, more than 100 CEOs of US public companies signed a Business Roundtable statement in which they pledged to deliver value...

Do Protests Matter At All for Shifting Government Policy Around Economic Redistribution?

New research on the effectiveness of protests on government distributions provides insights into the political incentives of a country’s leadership and the...

Mergers and Smoking Guns

A recently uncovered memo from George Stigler and Richard Posner reveals how they thought about antitrust and merger policy in advising the...

Will “Portfolio Primacy” Throw a Monkey Wrench in Elon Musk’s Plans to Acquire Twitter?

The SEC's definition of fiduciary duty allows institutional shareholders to vote against Elon Musk's Twitter takeover bid thanks to portfolio primacy.