Angus Deaton

Sir Angus Deaton is now a Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson School, where his main interests are in poverty, inequality, health, development, well-being, and the use of evidence in social science and medicine. He also has a part-time appointment as Presidential Professor of Economics at the University of Southern California. He has taught at Cambridge University and at the University of Bristol. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy, and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society, and was the first recipient of the Society's Frisch Medal for Applied Econometrics. His current pursuits include research on poverty and inequality around the world, on the appropriate use of randomized controlled trials, and on the determinants of health and well-being, particularly on relationships with income, both domestically and internationally. He was President of the American Economic Association in 2009. Ph.D. Cambridge University. He holds honorary doctorates from the University of Rome, Tor Vergata, University College, London, the University of St Andrews, the University of Edinburgh, the University of Cyprus, Brown University, and the University of Cambridge. He was the recipient of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel in 2015. In 2016, he was made a Knight Bachelor for his services to economics and international affairs.

Angus Deaton: Today’s Inequalities Are Signs That Democratic Capitalism Is Under Threat

At the launch of the IFS Deaton Review, a 5-year review of rising inequalities in the UK, Sir Angus Deaton decried extreme inequality and the...

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