David Dinielli

David Carter Dinielli is a Visiting Clinical Lecturer in Law at the Yale Law School and a Senior Policy Fellow at Yale’s Tobin Center for Economic Policy. At the Tobin Center, he works to develop antitrust and competition frameworks to address concentrated power in digital markets. At the law school, he teaches a clinical program that develops and deploys legal strategies to combat the diffuse social, societal, public health and other harms concentrated digital power enables. Prior to undertaking this work, Mr. Dinielli served for nearly seven years as Deputy Legal Director at the Southern Poverty Law Center, in Montgomery, Alabama, where he oversaw the Center’s anti-hate and extremism litigation as well as its LGBTQ rights work. For seventeen years prior to that, he was an associate, then partner, with Munger, Tolles & Olson, LLP, a national firm based in Los Angeles, where his practice focused on antitrust litigation and LGBTQ rights. Mr. Dinielli also served as Special Counsel to the Antitust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, working with the the team that successfully challenged the merger of AT&T and T-Mobile.

Why Congress Should Pass the American Innovation and Choice Online Act

The bill, which is the Senate is expected to vote on soon, would improve competition, increase innovation, benefit consumers, and provide the...

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