Cristina Poncibò

Cristina Poncibò is a professor of Comparative Private Law at the University of Turin’s Law Department. She is a fellow at the Transatlantic Technology Law Forum, co-sponsored by Stanford Law School and Vienna School of Law, and previously served as a Marie Curie Fellow (Université Panthéon-Assas), a Max Weber Fellow (EUI), and a Lagrange Fellow. Cristina’s research focuses on the comparative law of emerging technologies, much of which she distilled in her 2020 book, “Comparative Law and the Blockchain.” She also recently co-edited the volumes “Contracting and Contract Law in the Age of Artificial Intelligence” and “The Cambridge Handbook of Smart Contracts, Blockchain Technology and Digital Platforms.” She is a national rapporteur of the International Association of Comparative Law and a delegate of the Law Department to the American Association of Comparative Law. She is also a member of Ascola, Juris Diversitas and the Law & Society Association. Cristina received her LLM from the University of Turin and her PhD from the University of Florence (PhD).

How Should the Law Tackle Rapidly Evolving Financial Technologies?

The last half-century has witnessed an explosion of technology changing how the financial landscape functions for customers and new and legacy banking...

Latest news

Elections Hinder Companies’ Access to Credit

A large body of literature has produced uncertain conclusions about how elections affect firms’ access to credit. In a wide-ranging analysis of...

How Financial Contracting Could Help the Police Force Manage Its Aims More Effectively

Hamid Mehran proposes funded deferred pay, an incentive structure to mitigate the risk and costs of police misconduct.

Event Notes: “China’s Political Economy” in Review

The Stigler Center's "China Political Economy" webinar series returns Thursday, February 9. Here's a reminder of what we covered in our first...

To Build an Equitable Economy, We Must Understand Capitalism’s Racist Heritage

American capitalism was built on racial exploitation, from the enslavement of Black people to institutionalized discrimination and its structural impact on our...

How To Ensure Industrial Policy Promotes Public Over Private Gain

Industrial policy was once so out of fashion that it was jokingly called “the policy that shall not be named.” Now it’s...

More than Economics, Ideology Determines US Voters’ Preferences for Redistribution

The US stands out among developed economies for its comparatively low level of redistribution as a percentage of GDP. Gustavo de Souza...

Stakeholder Motivations for “Private Sanctions” Against Russia

As the war in Ukraine enters its second year, a new study measures stakeholders’ desire to see their firms exit Russia and...